All posts filed under: News

Institutional Planning

Conversations with Volunteer Interns Now that Quest has entered its second decade, the University has begun its second Institutional Planning cycle (IP), an ongoing process set to take place over the next five years. The IP seeks to evaluate Quest’s current internal and external status, and establish institutional goals. The process began with the update of the University’s Mission, Vision, and Values statement in the spring of 2017, and was followed by a series of events in the fall aimed at gathering feedback about Quest’s next decade from students, alumni, faculty, staff, and other interested parties – events otherwise known as Destination Quest. Quest’s IP cycle consists of four phases: Prepare, Plan, Do, and Review. The University is currently in the the first phase of this cycle – Prepare – which is comprised of three steps: the renewal of the Mission, Vision, and Values Statement, Destination Quest, and an environmental scan to evaluate the University’s internal strengths and weaknesses.    Since December 2017, several students have completed their experiential learning requirements through internships with Quest’s …

The Expense of the Mission

Quest, the Sea to Sky Foundation, and the true costs of building a school By Ian Greer and Elijah Cetas During a public meeting in January (this issue), President George Iwama stated that Quest currently faces the next, and near-last, payment on its startup loans: a roughly $20-million debt owed to a number of foundations affiliated with former Quest Board member Blake Bromley. According to the Board members present, the payment of the loan, which is due November 2019, may signal the end of a phase of financial insecurity that has troubled the university since its early years. Eschewing public donations, the founders of Quest relied upon a number of private donors to cover the costs of the campus and its operations. A separate charitable entity, the Sea to Sky Foundation, handled these donations, paid for the cost of development, and held the mortgage on the campus. To pay back loans, they put up for sale roughly three-quarters of a 256-acre endowment land, much of which has now been purchased by charity foundations and real …